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Crocheting and How to Stop Yarns From Tangling

Crocheting and How to Stop Yarns From Tangling

This is a perennial question when crocheting, and one that is not always satisfactorily solved.  One method is to keep each color of yarn in a shoe box, in the correct order, and to turn the box in the same direction as you turn your work at the end of each row. Contrary to the usual advice always to turn your work in the same direction when you are crocheting, turn it in opposite directions at the end of each row so that the ends of yarn...

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How Do I Join in New Yarn

How Do I Join in New Yarn

If you run out of yarn when you are crocheting, there are various ways of joining in a new yarn so you can continue crocheting your projects. 1st method: Is leaving a tail end of 2 or 3 inches of the old yarn, lay it along the wrong side of the work, which may or may not be facing you.  Insert the hook into the next stitch, and place the new yarn into the hook and draw it through. Insert the hook into the following stitch, under the old...

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How to Crochet a Circle

How to Crochet a Circle

Because only one tool is used for crochet, it is very easy to crochet in a circle, either to make flat pieces or tubes.  It can be worked as a spiral or in rounds joined with a slip stitch. The work can be turned at the end of each circle also making it  more reversible.  It is usually referred to as circular crochet even though all kinds of shapes can be made this way, including squares. There are at least three methods to choose from...

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Different Colors when Crocheting

Different Colors when Crocheting

When you are working with several colors in a row, as in pictorial crochet, there is no easy way of manipulating all the colors in your hand at once.  You can hold one color in each hand and feed them through as you work your crochet pattern. The basic method, when it comes to crochet, is simply  to drop the old color and  then take up the new one.  However, you might find that it’s slightly quicker, in situations where you have...

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Edgings Inserts and Braids what are the Differences

Edgings Inserts and Braids what are the Differences

Edging is a term refer to trimmings or decorative edges on a finished piece. Edgings can be worked directly on the piece or stitched on afterward.  If they are to be crocheted directly onto the fabric, they are made horizontally and worked into the stitches at the top or bottom, or along the sides. They can be of any depth and usually finish with a scalloped or zigzag edge.  Edgings can also be made vertically, where they will usually...

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How Do I Crochet the First Row

How Do I Crochet the First Row

The first row of crochet is often the most difficult to work.  It can sometimes help to use a larger size hook for the foundation row than you are going to use for the body of the work. When you have made your row of chains, tip them toward you slightly and you will see that each crochet stitch is made up of three strands:  what looks like a row of “V” at the front and a ridge at the back. The most usual way of working into...

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What if I make the Foundation chain too long

What if I make the Foundation chain too long

The number of chain stitches you need to make in your foundation row is always more than the number of stitches you have in your first row. This is because the first two or three stitches actually take the place of your first stitch, that is, the one at the outside edge of the piece.  You then skip the next chain before working into the following one, or as instructed in the pattern. To begin a piece that does not give explicit...

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How to Crochet a Popcorn Stitch

How to Crochet a Popcorn Stitch

Popcorn stitches are  similar to bobbles, but they stand out even more because they are folded back on themselves.  They can be made over any number of stitches, as can the other stitches just described. They can be mede over any number of stitches, as can the other stitches just described.  They are best made with double crochet or longer stitches.  Popcorn stitches give depth and texture to your work. Popcorn stitches are not hard to...

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What is a Chain Space

What is a Chain Space

Basic stitches can be made more decorative and open by working a chain stitch between them and missing a stitch before working the next one. If you don’t miss a stitch you will increase the width of the piece, useful when making shawls or circular pieces. The chain stitch above a missed stitch will make a small hole, called the chain space. If you need to work into it on the next row, work directly into the next row, work directly in...

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How to Double Crochet Decrease

How to Double Crochet Decrease

To do a double crochet decrease depends on which stitch you are using.  When you are working with a double crochet, to decrease at the beginning of a row, make the turning chain but then miss it and insert the hook into the following stitch. At the end of the row, in order to make the edges match, miss the last stitch and work into the top of the turning chain. If you miss the turning chain, you will get a stepped edge, which is not as...

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What are the Basic Crochet Stitches

What are the Basic Crochet Stitches

There are only four basic stitches in crochet.  These are chain stitch, slip stitch, single crochet and double crochet.  Other stitches are only variations on these. These few basic stitches combine to make an infinite number of patterns, some simple and some that look intricate, but are worked in the same way.  Once you have mastered the basic skills, you will be able to create a multitude of patterns. The chain stitch is the foundation...

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How to Double Crochet Increase

How to Double Crochet Increase

If you are working with single or double crochet, the easiest method of increasing two or three stitches at each end of a row is to work them into one stitch. Work the extra stitches at the beginning of the row into the stitch that the turning chain stands on.  At the end of the row, work them all into the top of the turning chain. Make the turning chains a little looser than you normally would.  However, if you are working these...

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How to Triple Crochet

How to Triple Crochet

Triple crochet, which is also sometimes known as treble crochet, is the first of the longer stitches.  It is not often used on its own to form a complete fabric but is frequently worked as part of a pattern, especially when making shells. It makes looser patterns than the stitches described previously and is useful when you want to make something soft and fluid.  It makes a very nice stitch, a little tricky when starting out with it but...

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How to Make a Single Crochet

How to Make a Single Crochet

Single crochet is the simplest and shortest of the true fabric stitches.  It is sometimes known as a short stitch.  It is a firm stitch and makes a fabric that looks the same on both sides.  It is worked in two stages. Make a simple foundation chain and insert the hook into the second chain as before.  Wrap the yarn over and draw it through the chain.  You will now have two loops on your hook. Wrap the yarn over the hook again and draw...

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How to Double Crochet

How to Double Crochet

The double crochet stitch is probably the most widely used stitch in crochet,  it forms the basis of many of the pattern stitches as well as being the primary stitch in filet crochet.  It is worked in three stages.  Like single crochet, if worked on every row, the fabric will appear the same on both sides. It is a little more open than single crochet and has a softer drape.  It is the stitch that makes the majority of crochet patterns...

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